Toxic Elements

Although not living, solvents and toxins must exhibit char­acteristic frequencies, otherwise how could the Syncrometer detect specific ones? This needs further exploration.

Most of the toxic elements I use are metals, heavy metals and lanthanides. But some are not; examples are PCBs and for­maldehyde.

Some important elements are missing, like iron, zinc and manganese. This is because I never could find them present in the white blood cells, and I finally gave up searching for them.

Below is a list of the 70 or so toxic elements I use. Most of them were obtained as Atomic Absorption standard solutions and are, therefore, very pure. This prevents mistakes in identi­fying a toxin. They were stored in bounce amber glass bottles with bakelite caps and permanently sealed with plastic film since testing did not require them to be opened (they get close enough to the frequency field). The exact concentration and the solubility characteristics are not important in this qualitative test. The main sources of these substances in our environment are given beside each item.

Toxic Substance

Sources

Aflatoxin B

beer, bread, apple cider vinegar, moldy fruit, nuts

Aluminum

cookware, deodorant, lotions, soaps

Aluminum silicate

salt, water softener

Antimony

fragrance in lotions, colognes

Arsenic

pesticide, “treated” carpet, wallpaper

Asbestos

clothes dryer belt, hair blower, paint on radiators

Barium

lipstick, bus exhaust

Benzalkonium

chloride

toothpaste

3,4 Benzopyrene

flame cooked foods, toast

4,5 Benzopyrene

flame cooked foods, toast

Beryllium

hurricane lamps, gasoline, dentures, kerosene

Bismuth

colognes, lotions, antacids

Boron

Bromine

bleached “brominated” flour

Cadmium

galvanized water pipes, old tooth fillings

Cerium

tooth fillings

Cesium

clear plastic bottles used for beverages

Chlorine

from ChloroxTM bleach

Chromium

cosmetics, water softener

Cobalt

detergent, blue and green body products

Copper

tooth fillings, water pipes

Dysprosium

paint and varnish

Erbium

packaging for food, pollutant in pills

Europium

tooth fillings

Europium oxide

tooth fillings, catalytic converter

Fiberglass

dust from remodeling or building insulation

Formaldehyde

foam in mattresses and furniture, paneling

Gadolinium

tooth fillings

Gallium

tooth fillings

Germanium

with thallium in tooth fillings (pollutant)

Gold

tooth fillings

Hafnium

hair spray, nail polish, pollutant in pills

Holmium

usually found in presence of PCBs

Indium

tooth fillings

Iridium

tooth fillings

Lanthanum

computer and printing supplies

Lead

solder joints in water pipes

Lithium

printing supplies

Lutetium

paint and varnish

Mercury

tooth fillings

Molybdenum

auto supplies

Neodymium

pollutant in pills

Nickel

tooth fillings, metal glasses frames

Niobium

pollutant in pills, foil packaging for food

Palladium

tooth fillings

Platinum

tooth fillings

Polychlorinated biphenyl PCB

detergent, hair spray, salves

Polyvinyl chloride acetate (PVC)

glues, building supplies, leaking cooling system

Praseodymium

pollutant in pills

Radon

cracks in basement cement, water pipes

Rhenium

spray starch

Rhodium

tooth fillings

Rubidium

tooth fillings

Ruthenium

tooth fillings

Samarium

tooth fillings

Scandium

tooth fillings

Selenium

Silver

tooth fillings

Sodium fluoride

toothpaste

Strontium

toothpaste, water softener

Tantalum

tooth fillings

Tellurium

tooth fillings

Terbium

pollutant in pills

Thallium acetate

pollutant in mercury tooth fillings

Thorium nitrate

earth (dust)

Thulium

pollutant in many brands of Vitamin C

Tin

toothpaste

Titanium

tooth fillings, body powder

Tungsten

electric water heater, toaster, hair curler

Uranium acetate

earth (dust)

Vanadium pentoxide

gas leak in home, candles (not necessarily lit)

Ytterbium

pollutant in pills

Yttrium

pollutant in pills

Zirconium

deodorant, toothpaste

Solvents

This is a list of all the solvents I use together with the main source of them in our environment. These are chemicals, very pure, obtained from chemical supply companies, unless other­wise stated. Those marked with an asterisk (*) were the subject of a recent book The Neurotoxicity of Solvents by Peter Arlien- Soburg, 1992, CRC Press.

Solvent

Source

1,1,1, Trichloro ethane*

(TCE)

flavored foods

2,5-Hexane dione*

flavored foods

2 Butanone*

(methyl ethyl ketone)

flavored foods

2 Hexanone*

(methyl butyl ketone)

flavored foods

2 Methyl propanol

2 Propanol (propyl alcohol)

see the propyl alcohol list

Acetone

store-bought drinking water, cold cereals, pet food, animal feed

Acetonylacetone

(2,5 hexanedione)

flavored foods

Benzene

see the benzene list (page 354)

Butyl nitrite

Carbon tetrachloride

store-bought drinking water, cold cereals, pet food, animal feeds

Decane

health food cookies and cereals

Denatured alcohol

obtained from pharmacy

Dichloromethane*

(methylene chloride)

store-bought orange juice, herb tea blends

Gasoline regular leaded

obtained at gasoline station

Grain alcohol

95% ethyl alcohol obtained at liquor store

Hexanes*

decaffeinated beverages

Isophorone

flavored foods

Kerosene

obtained at gasoline station

Methanol (wood alcohol)

colas, artificial sweeteners, infant formula

Mineral oil

lotions

Mineral spirits

obtained from paint store

Paradichlorobenzene

mothballs

Pentane

decaffeinated beverages

Petroleum ether

in some gasolines

Styrene*

styrofoam dishes

Toluene*

store-bought drinking water, cold cereals

Trichloroethylene*

(TCEthylene)

flavored foods

Xylene*

store-bought drinking water, cold cereals

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