Hair Spray

I don’t have a recipe that holds your hair as well as the bottle of chemicals you can buy at the store. Remarkably a little lemon juice (not from a bottle) has some holding power and no odor! Buy a 1 cup spray bottle. Squeeze part of a lemon, letting only the clear juice run into the bottle. Fill with water. Keep it in the refrigerator. Make it fresh every week. spraying with just plain water is nearly as good! For shinier hair, drop a bit of lemon peel into the bottle.

Homemade Soap

A small plastic dishpan, about 10” x 12”

A glass or enamel 2-quart sauce pan 1 can of lye (sodium hydroxide), 12 ounces 3 pounds of lard (BHT and BHA are OK here)

Plastic gloves Water

1. Pour 3 cups of very cold water (refrigerate water overnight first) into the 2-quart saucepan.

2. slowly and carefully add the lye, a little bit at a time, stir­ring it with a wooden or plastic utensil. (Use plastic gloves for this; test them for holes first.) Do not breathe the vapor or lean over the container or have children nearby. Above all use no metal. The mixture will get very hot. In olden days, a sassafras branch was used to stir, imparting a fra­grance and insect deterrent for mosquitoes, lice, fleas, ticks.

3. Let cool at least one hour in a safe place. Meanwhile, the unwrapped lard should be warming up to room temperature in the plastic dishpan.

4. Slowly and carefully, pour the lye solution into the dishpan with the lard. The lard will melt. Mix thoroughly, at least 15 minutes, until it looks like thick pudding.

5. Let it set until the next morning; then cut it into bars. It will get harder after a few days. Then package.

If you wish to make soap based on olive oil, use about 48 ounces. It may need to harden for a week.

Liquid Soap

Make chips from your homemade soap cake. Add enough hot water to dissolve. Add citric acid to balance the pH (7 to 8). If you do not, this soap may be too harsh for your skin.

Skin Sanitizer

Make up a 5 to 10% solution of food grade alcohol. Food grade alcohols are grain (ethyl) alcohol or vodka. Find a suit­able dispenser bottle. Mark it with a pen at about one tenth of the way up from the bottom. Pour 95% grain alcohol (190 proof) to this mark (for 50% grain alcohol or vodka make your mark one fifth of the way up). Add water to the top. Keep shut. You may add a chip of lemon peel for fragrance.

Use this for general sanitizing purposes: bathroom fixtures, knobs, handles, canes, walkers, and for personal cleanliness (but use chlorine bleach for the toilet bowl once a week). Always clean up after a bowel movement with wet toilet paper. This is not clean enough, though. Follow with a stronger damp paper towel. This is still not clean enough; use a final damp paper towel with skin sanitizer added. After washing hands, sanitize them too, pouring a bit on one palm and put finger tips of the other hand in it, scratch to get under nails, repeat on other hand. Rinse with water.

Do not use this recipe, nor keep any bottles of alcohol in the house of a recovering alcoholic.

Deodorant

Your sweat is odorless. It is the entrenched bacteria feeding on it that make smells. You can never completely rid yourself of these bacteria, although they may temporarily be gone after zapping. The strategy is to control their numbers. Here are sev­eral deodorants to try. Find one that works best for you:

Vitamin C water. Mix H tsp. to a pint of water and dab it on. Then dab on cornstarch.

Citric Acid water. Mix H tsp. to a pint of water and dab it on. Then dab on cornstarch.

only a few drops of these acids under each armpit are nec­essary. If these acids burn the skin, dilute them more. Never ap­ply anything to skin that has just been shaved!

Corn starch. Many people need only this. Dab it on.

Use only unpolluted cornstarch (see Sources).

Baking soda has been deleted as a deodorant because ben­zene was found in some boxes.

Lemon juice. This acid is not as strong, use what you need.

Pure alcohol (never rubbing alcohol). The food grade alco­hols are grain alcohol and vodka. Dab a bit under each arm and/or on your shirt or blouse, then dab on cornstarch. If the al­cohol burns, dilute it with water. Be very careful not to leave the bottle where a child or alcoholic person could find it. Pour it into a different bottle!

Pure zinc oxide. You may ask your pharmacist to order this for you. she or he may wish to make it up for you too, but do not let them add anything else to it. It should be about 1 part zinc oxide powder to 3 parts water. It does not dissolve. Just shake it up to use it. After you get it home, you can add cornstarch to it to give it a creamy texture. Heat 3 tsp. cornstarch in 1 cup of water, to boiling, until dissolved and clear. Cool and add some to the zinc oxide mixture (about equal parts). store unused starch mixture in the refrigerator. Only make up enough for a month.

Alcohol and zinc oxide. This is the most powerful deodor­ant. Apply alcohol first, then the zinc oxide, then dab on corn­starch.

Remember that you need to sweat! sweating excretes toxic substances, especially from the upper body. Don’t use deodorant on weekends. Go to the sink and wipe clean the armpits like our grandparents did. Often, just plain cornstarch is enough! These homemade deodorants are not as powerful as the commercial varieties-this is to your advantage.